Prebiotics may reduce stress related insomnia !




New research carried out by Monika Fleshner at University of California (Boulder) shows that probiotics might reduce stress related insomnia.

Prebiotics are dietary fibers naturally found in Chicory, artichokes, raw garlic, leeks, cabbage and onions. They serve as the main food for the guts healthy bacterias the probiotics, and science suggests that adding prebiotics is much more efficient in restoring a healthy gut
micro biome then adding the probiotics itself.

Fleshner’s study was carried out on 3 week old male rats that was fed chow with or without probiotics.

The study found that the rats fed a prebiotic diet spend more time in NREM sleep which is the restorative sleep cycle, compared to the rats on a non prebiotic diet. This pattern was also found after exposing the rats to stress.

The study concludes that it’s still to early to say that probiotics should be a recommended supplement as a sleep aid and that we need to conduct more studies.

From a personal point of view, I say that the findings are extremely interesting. We know already that stress distorts the gut micro biome, and as such it makes sense for stressed people to digest prebiotics. We also know that keeping a healthy micro biome in the gut helps to lower chronic inflammation, and that stress induces inflammation. So there’s a lot of the findings in this study that makes sense – and taking prebiotics together with saffron ( which we have covered in a number of articles on this blog) might actually be a really good choice to combat stress related insomnia.

POOR SLEEP LINKED TO ALZHEIMERS !




A group og researchers at Stanford University set their minds into studying how one night of poor sleep would affect brain function.

David M. Holzman and colleagues studied 17 adults between 35 and 65 years of age. None of them had problems with sleeping but half of them was for one single night exposed to sounds that would keep them from deep uninterrupted sleep.

What the study found was that a single night of poor sleep boost amyloid beta, a protein that has been linked with Alzheimers. The study also found that a full week of poor sleep elevates tau, another brain protein tied to brain damage in Alzheimers and a number of other neurological diseases.

The study report acknowledges that the weakness of the study is the small study group but gives a clear picture as to what sleep means for not only the risk of Alzheimers but also other neurological diseases.

In my opinion the most alarming finding in this study is that just one night of poor sleep is enough to elevate amyloid beta – and that given how easy the protein is raised, it also points to a link between stress and Alzheimers as well as other neurological diseases.